Southern Fried Corn

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Hi folks!  Sorry I’ve been out of pocket here lately!  We took a much needed vacation between Heather’s semesters in conjunction with our seafood tour.  Sorry I didn’t let y’all know.  I just hate to announce, “Hey robbers and thieves, I’m on vacation so please come to my house and rob me blind,” on Facebook or the internet.  I really appreciate all the sweet comments and emails wondering what had happened to me.  I feel loved.  ~grins~

After a week at the beach, I’m refreshed and relaxed and ready to get back to sharing some awesome recipes with y’all.  One of my most favorite parts about visiting the Gulf Shores/Orange Beach area is this awesome farmers market on the way home, Burris Farmers Market.  On this trip we came home with green tomatoes, new potatoes, okra, Silver Queen corn, and cucumbers just to name a few.  Over the next few weeks, you see lots of recipes using these fresh veggies.

First up is fried corn.  Now, for those of you not familiar with Southern fried corn, it’s not a big ol’ ear of corn deep fried.  I guess you’d liken it to creamed corn.  But I don’t think they’re much alike; that’s just the only thing I know to compare it to.  Fried corn is one of my absolute favorite vegetable sides and I look forward to early summer and the first crops of corn each year so I can have some.  I could literally hurt myself eating fried corn. The trick with fried corn is the prep.  You can’t just cut it off the cob and throw it in a skillet.  There’s a little more involved, but I promise it’s not too hard.  I’ve even added a quick little video illustrating my “corn scraping” technique to help you along.

So the other day, I had shucked and cleaned my corn and gotten rid of all the silks when my wife walked into the kitchen.  Feeling impressed with my feat (which shucking and cleaning corn is quite a  feat) I remarked, “That’s a pretty good looking mess of corn there, huh?”  She looked at me with amazement and explained that she had never heard me use the term “mess” of anything.  Being a true Southerner, she had heard it before, but apparently never out of my mouth.  I’m sure I’ve said it before.  I’m guessing it was just a case of selective hearing if you know what I mean.  Anyway, so she asks, “How much exactly is a ‘mess’?”  Stumped, I thought about it and said, “Well, I guess a mess is just about enough to have for dinner.”  How much is “a mess” to you?

 

Ingredients

  • 8 to 10 ears of fresh corn, I prefer the Silver Queen variety
  • 2 tablespoons of bacon grease (not necessary but sure makes a big difference)
  • 4 tablespoons of butter, divided (or 6 if you’re not using bacon grease)
  • salt & pepper

Directions

    1. With your corn shucked and cleaned, place it standing up in a large bowl or pan in your sink.  (Cutting corn off the cob is quite a task and a messy one at that.  I think it’s best to do it in the sink.  You’ll thank me later when it’s time to clean up.)  Run a sharp knife down the cob cutting the kernels about halfway off leaving the other half attached.  We’re going to address that other half in a minute.
    2. Next, we’re going to scrape all the starch and “goody” out of the remaining kernels.  This is what gives fried corn it’s unique texture and flavor.  Simply turn your knife perpendicular to the cob and scrape down the sides.
    3. Heat a skillet (preferably cast iron – I always use my great-grandmother’s – it’s one of my most prized possessions – it’s second to be grabbed in case of a fire after my kid) over medium heat and add bacon grease and two tablespoons of butter (or 4 tablespoons of butter if you’re not using the bacon grease – but you should use the bacon grease).  Once melted, add corn.  Salt and pepper to taste.
    4. Stir frequently cooking for 20 to 30 minutes.  Immediately before removing from heat, add remaining butter and stir until melted.

Southern Fried Corn

Rating: 51

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour

Southern Fried Corn

Ingredients

  • 8 to 10 ears of fresh corn, I prefer the Silver Queen variety
  • 2 tablespoons of bacon grease (not necessary but sure makes a big difference)
  • 4 tablespoons of butter, divided (or 6 if you’re not using bacon grease)
  • salt & pepper

Instructions

With your corn shucked and cleaned, place it standing up in a large bowl or pan in your sink. (Cutting corn off the cob is quite a task and a messy one at that. I think it’s best to do it in the sink. You’ll thank me later when it’s time to clean up.) Run a sharp knife down the cob cutting the kernels about halfway off leaving the other half attached. We’re going to address that other half in a minute.

Next, we’re going to scrape all the starch and “goody” out of the remaining kernels. This is what gives fried corn it’s unique texture and flavor. Simply turn your knife perpendicular to the cob and scrape down the sides.

Heat a skillet (preferably cast iron – I always use my great-grandmother’s – it’s one of my most prized possessions – it’s second to be grabbed in case of a fire after my kid) over medium heat and add bacon grease and two tablespoons of butter (or 4 tablespoons of butter if you’re not using the bacon grease – but you should use the bacon grease). Once melted, add corn. Salt and pepper to taste.

Stir frequently cooking for 20 to 30 minutes. Immediately before removing from heat, add remaining butter and stir until melted.

http://southernbite.com/2011/05/24/southern-fried-corn/

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Comments

  1. ok..so now my mouth is watering!! I’ve never made fried corn but will definitely give it a try..in my grandmother’s cast iron skillet!

  2. Kathryne says:

    Fried corn is one of my summer favorites. Can’t wait until we can get some fresh around here.

  3. Oh my I love me some fried corn. This weekend we are planing on going to the farmers farm to pick strawberries so I’m definitely picking up some corn they have alreay picked for selling and make your fried corn recipe. Your dinner plate looked so good with the fried corn and cucumbers, but I coulnd’t make out what else you had there, but it sure looked yummy!

  4. My tiny great grandmother used to make this when I was a kid. She fried it in fatback grease. Oh it was sooooo good!

  5. I love fried corn, and yes it taste better with bacon grease!!!! This recipe is just calling out to me! A “mess” to me is equal to plenty for a meal and some leftovers for the next day.

  6. I have ate Fried Corn all my life , 60+ years and have had many a relative cook it. But the Best by far was my Grandmaw’s from Homerville, Ga. Her family always had Hog’s and Cow’s and grew ton’s of plain ole Field Corn. She made her Fried Corn in a Big Ole Cast Iron frying pan and always used bacon grease and black pepper..
    I sure wish I knew where to get me some good ole Field Corn.. It’s just as good boiled on the ear.. I like Silver Queen and Merritt also but nothing takes me back like Field Corn….

    • I love fresh corn just about anyway, but this is my favorite. I love when my recipes bring back memories for my readers! Thanks so much for sharing!

  7. Oh my, fried corn is one of my favorites and I NEVER have it. I admit, I never tried to make it because I knew I couldn’t compete with my Granny and my aunties back in Tennessee. My aunt visited me a while back and showed me (and my daughter) how to make it. She scraped the cob just like you described!
    I have to ask.. how do you store bacon grease? My mamma used to have an old crock looking pot on her stovetop that had bacon grease in it. She would turn it up and pour some in to whatever dish needed flavoring. Is that the right way to do it or does the health dept kind of frown on leaving it out?
    I’m going to make this for my yankee husband. My favorite auntie who showed me how to make this is very very sick in the hospital now and I want to honor her :)

  8. Terry Brown says:

    My family and older folks in the Wiregrass always used field corn (yellow dent) which is difficult to find these days. It must be scaped the day its picked as it just becomes grinding corn or cow feed after it hardens. We have always called it Rocky Head corn after the community in Dale County where my grandparent’s farm was located. The entire cob was scrapped and there were no visible kernels. It was almost like a pudding but was definitly fried corn. I haven’t had it in years but I could eat “a bait” of it and still want more.

  9. Nan D uke says:

    Hello! I just read about you in the Mtgy. Advertiser…and had to check out your website and blog. I cannot wait to try the fried corn and many more of your recipes!

    Thank you for keeping up the Southern way of cooking and I will definitely share your site with friends and family!

  10. Hi Nan! Welcome! Robyn did such a great job with that article, I really appreciate her doing that for me! I hope that you’ll try some of my recipes and come back and let me know what you think! Please let me know if you ever have any questions or need anything.

  11. Everytime I make this I have to make 2 skillets full (and I have the deep -chicken frier one) full or keep quiet. My kids love it and all flock over when they hear that I am fixing fried corn. Or they call and beg me to save them some.

  12. My mother always fried some fat back, then added corn to the fat back drippings. She was a great cook and I always loved her corn. I do not use fat back drippings but use butter for my fried corn.

  13. Alison Barwick says:

    Yum! Yum! This mirrors what I learned from my grandmother. Wonderful with just about anything – meatloaf, stuffed peppers – you name it. Might just have to have some with fried okra this weekend!

  14. Susan Chapman says:

    I’ve cleaned more than my fair share of corn and can get all the milk out. Yjis makes me miss my Daddy and Momma and all the fresh, straight from the garden veggies.

  15. Oh, thanks for the memories of my Nana’s kitchen. she used the same process and ingredients and I never saw such thing go so fast, as soon as it hit the table. Beware, this dish is not for the faint at work! I can’t believe we kids didn’t help; we never knew it was such a task. I have made this since grown and found out why she always called it ” liquid gold”.

  16. Awesome recipe—JUST like my mother makes! Other recipes call for including bacon, but bacon grease (AKA elixir of the gods) is all you need. Your photo even “looks right!” Thanks, Stacey, for bringing back some great summertime memories.

  17. Gail Ann Wacker says:

    OMG! This Yankee is dyin’ to try this. Looks like the recipe will only serve one – ME! I am not sure if I will eat it, or just roll around in it, it looks so good…

  18. Gail Ann Wacker says:

    Do you ever allow readers to send recipes for your consideration?

  19. If I use frozen corn, how much should I use? Cups or ounces?

  20. My stepmother, who was from TN, made this every Thanksgiving. Since she went home to be with the Lord 3 years ago, it has fallen to me to make it because nobody else watched her. Thankfully, I did. This is the only way to eat corn. So delicious. I am glad I found your website, I don’t remember her using bacon grease, but I will for this Easter dinner. Yummy stuff.

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